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Current ANES Board

John Aldrich

John Aldrich, Chair


Duke University

John Aldrich is Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science at Duke University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Rochester. Professor Aldrich specializes in American politics and behavior, formal theory, and methodology. Books he has authored or co-authored include Why Parties?, Before the Convention, Linear Probability, Logit and Probit Models, and a series of books on elections, including Change and Continuity in the 2008 Elections. His articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Choice, and other journals and edited volumes. Current projects include studies of various aspects of campaigns and elections, political parties, and Congress. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and has served as co-editor of the American Journal of Political Science and as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the Rockefeller Center, Bellagio, Italy. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He served as President of the American Political Science Association (2013-2014) and, in 2014, received the Frank J. Goodnow Award from APSA for exemplary service to the profession. Professor Aldrich also served on the ANES Board from 2002 to 2013, chairing it since 2010.

More information can be found at: http://sites.duke.edu/aldrich/
Matt Barreto

Matt A. Barreto


University of California, Los Angeles

Matt A. Barreto is Professor of Political Science and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA and the co-founder of the research and polling firm Latino Decisions (with Gary Segura). Time Magazine called Latino Decisions the "gold-standard in Latino American polling" and Barreto's research was recognized in the 30 Latinos who made the 2012 election by Politic365, and was named one of the top 15 leading Latino pundits by Huffington Post which said Barreto was "the pollster that has his finger on the pulse of the Latino electorate."

He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Irvine, and had been on the faculty at the University of Washington for 9 years before joining UCLA in 2015. His research examines the political participation of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, especially among Latinos, and his work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Political Research Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, Public Opinion Quarterly, and other peer reviewed journals.

He is the author of three books: Ethnic Cues: The role of shared ethnicity in Latino political behavior (Michigan, 2010); Change They Can't Believe In: the Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America (Princeton, 2013, with Christopher Parker); and Latino America: How America's Most Dynamic Population is Poised to Transform the Politics of the Nation (Public Affairs, 2014 with Gary Segura).

Barreto has been invited to brief the U.S. Senate, the White House, Congressional Committees, and has been a keynote speaker at many of the major Hispanic association conferences including NALEO, LULAC, CHCI, NCLR and others. In 2008, Barreto was a co-principal investigator (with Gary Segura) of the American National Election Study Latino oversample, which included the first ever Spanish language translation of the ANES and the first ever oversample of Latino voters. He was first appointed to the ANES Board in 2009.

More information can be found at: http://mattbarreto.com/

Shaun Bowler

Shaun Bowler


University of California, Riverside

Shaun Bowler is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Riverside. He received his Ph.D. from Washington University, St. Louis. Professor Bowler's research interests include comparative electoral systems and voting behavior. His work examines the relationship between institutional arrangements and voter choice in a variety of settings ranging from the Republic of Ireland to California's initiative process. Professor Bowler is the author of Demanding Choices: Opinion Voting and Direct Democracy with Todd Donovan, University of Michigan Press (University of Michigan Press, 1998) and has published in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and American Politics Quarterly.

More information can be found at: http://politicalscience.ucr.edu/people/faculty/bowler/
Jamie Druckman

James N. Druckman


Northwestern University

James N. Druckman is the Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. He is also an Honorary Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research focuses on political preference formation and communication. His recent work examines how citizens make political, economic, and social decisions in various contexts (e.g., settings with multiple competing messages, online information, deliberation). He also researches the relationship between citizens' preferences and public policy, and how political elites make decisions under varying institutional conditions.

More information can be found at: http://faculty.wcas.northwestern.edu/~jnd260/
Morris Fiorina

Morris P. Fiorina


Stanford University

Morris P. Fiorina is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He received his B.A. degree from Allegheny College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Rochester. His current research focuses on elections and public opinion with particular attention to the quality of representation: how well the positions of elected officials reflect the preferences of the public. His 2004 book Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel J. Abrams and Jeremy C. Pope) attracted wide attention in the national media. Other recent books include The New American Democracy (Longman, 6th edition, 2009) and Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in the United States with Samuel J. Abrams (University of Oklahoma Press, 2009). Fiorina has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of more than a dozen journals on political science, law, political economy, and public policy. In 2006, he received the Warren E. Miller Prize for career contributions to the field of elections, public opinion, and voting behavior, from the American Political Science Association. From 1986 to 1990 he was chairman of the ANES Board.

More information can be found at: http://www.hoover.org/profiles/morris-p-fiorina

forthcoming

Alan Gerber


Yale University

Alan Gerber is the Dilley Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of American Politics at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research currently focuses on the application of experimental methods to the study of campaign communications. Gerber has designed and performed experimental evaluations of many campaigns and fundraising programs, both partisan and non-partisan in nature. His research has appeared in numerous academic journals including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, as well as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. He is the co-author of Field Experiments: Design, Analysis, and Interpretation (Norton, 2012) and Get Out the Vote! (Brookings Institution, 2004).

More information can be found at: http://politicalscience.yale.edu/people/alan-gerber
Anna Greenberg

Anna Greenberg


Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research

Anna Greenberg has over 15 years of experience polling in the political, non-profit and academic sectors. She joined GQRR in 2001, after teaching public opinion and survey research methodology at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. She was the lead pollster in many successful campaigns including for Mayor Bill de Blasio, Governor-Elect Tom Wolf, Governor Mark Dayton, former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, Congressman Ron Barber and Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham.

In 2014, Greenberg won the "Pollster of the Year" award from the AAPC for her work with Mayor Bill de Blasio's campaign for mayor of New York City.

Greenberg works with a wide range of NGOs on issues ranging from women's health to LGBT rights to attitudes about religion to reducing gun violence to reforming drug laws. She heads GQR Digital and is a leader in the growing field of data analytics and micro-targeting, measuring the impact of social media on public opinion and using social media to move voters, consumers, and activists.

A sought after commentator, Greenberg has appeared on CBS' Face the Nation, NPR's All Things Considered and Morning Edition and BBC's World News America. She regularly provides commentary on politics to publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, and Politico.

Greenberg serves on the National Board of the American National Election Study (2014-2017) and is a research fellow at American University's Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies. She holds a BA in Government from Cornell University and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago.

More information can be found at: http://www.gqrr.com
D. Sunshine Hillygus

D. Sunshine Hillygus


Duke University

D. Sunshine Hillygus is Associate Professor of Political Science at Duke University. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University in 2003. Her research and teaching specialties include public opinion, political behavior, survey research, campaigns and elections, and information technology and society. She is co-author of The Hard Count: The Social and Political Challenges of the 2000 Census (Russell Sage Foundation, 2006) and The Persuadable Voter: Wedge Issues in Political Campaigns (Princeton University Press, 2008), winner of Robert E. Lane award for the best book in political psychology published in 2008. Hillygus is the recipient of multiple research grants from the National Science Foundation. She is founder and director of the Duke Initiative on Survey Methodology and serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the U.S. Census Bureau.

More information can be found at: http://sites.duke.edu/hillygus/
D. Sunshine Hillygus

Leonie Huddy


Stony Brook University

Leonie Huddy is a Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Survey Research at Stony Brook University, NY. She has a PhD in social psychology and her work focuses on psychological approaches to public opinion and survey research. She is the co-editor of the award winning Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology, former co- editor of the journal Political Psychology, and past president of the International Society for Political Psychology. Her research articles have appeared in numerous journals including the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Psychology, and the American Psychologist. She currently serves on several editorial boards and appears regularly on CSB Radio as an exit poll analyst.

More information can be found at: http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~lhuddy/
Shanto Iyengar

Shanto Iyengar


Stanford University

Shanto Iyengar holds a joint appointment as the Harry and Norman Chandler Chair in Communication and Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. Iyengar is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science. He is considered the world's leading authority on media politics and served as the managing editor of Political Communication between 2017 and 2014. His areas of expertise include the news media, public opinion, political campaigns, and experimental design. He is the author of Media Politics: A Citizen's Guide (Norton, 2011); News That Matters (University of Chicago Press, 1987, 2010), Is Anyone Responsible? (University of Chicago Press, 1991), The Media Game: American Politics in the Television Age (Macmillan, 1993), Explorations in Political Psychology (Duke University Press, 1995), and Going Negative (Free Press, 1995).

More information can be found at: https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/people/shanto-iyengar
Jennifer Lawless

Jennifer L. Lawless


American University

Jennifer L. Lawless is professor of Government at American University in Washington, D.C., where she also serves as the Director of the Women & Politics Institute. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University in 2003 and her B.A. from Union College in 1997. Professor Lawless' research, which has been supported by the National Science Foundation, focuses on representation, political ambition, and gender in the electoral process. She is the co-author (with Richard Fox) of the books Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned Off to Politics (Oxford University Press, 2015) and It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don't Run for Office (Cambridge 2010); and the author of Becoming a Candidate: Political Ambition and the Decision to Run for Office (Cambridge 2012). Her work has appeared in academic journals including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Perspectives on Politics, Journal of Politics, i> Political Research Quarterly, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and Politics & Gender (of which she served as editor from 2010-2013). She is a nationally recognized speaker on electoral politics. Her scholarly analysis and political commentary have been quoted in numerous newspapers, magazines, television news programs, and radio shows, including The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, USA Today, The New Republic, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Associated Press Newswire, Reuters, The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell, The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer, the CBS Evening News, ABC World News Tonight, CNN.com, and MSNBC.com. Professor Lawless also appeared in the 2011 film Miss Representation, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. The documentary exposes how the mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.

More information can be found at: http://www.american.edu/spa/faculty/lawless.cfm
Geoff Layman

Geoff Layman


University of Notre Dame

Geoff Layman is Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. He received his Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1995. He taught previously at Vanderbilt University and the University of Maryland. He specializes in political parties, political behavior, and religion and politics, focusing especially on long-term changes in the parties and their electoral coalitions. Layman's first book, The Great Divide: Religious and Cultural Conflict in American Party Politics (Columbia, 2001), examines the growing division of the Democratic and Republican parties along religious and cultural lines. He is currently involved in two book-length projects: one with Thomas Carsey on "conflict extension" and polarization in American party politics, and another with David Campbell and John Green on the political causes and consequences of growing secularism in the U.S. He is also involved in a variety of other projects on public opinion, electoral behavior, and religion and politics. He has published numerous articles in the discipline's leading journals, including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, and the Annual Review of Political Science.

More information can be found at:
http://politicalscience.nd.edu/faculty/faculty-list/geoffrey-c-layman/
Taeku Lee

Taeku Lee


University of California at Berkeley

Taeku Lee is Professor of Political Science and Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include racial and ethnic politics, Asian American politics, public opinion and survey research, policy responsiveness, and political participation. He has (co)written or (co)edited Mobilizing Public Opinion (2002); Transforming Politics, Transforming America (2006), Why Americans Don't Join the Party (2011), Accountability through Public Opinion (2011), Asian American Political Participation (2011). Lee is Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, Managing Director of Asian American Decisions, and co-Principal Investigator of the 2008 and 2012 National Asian American Surveys. Lee currently also serves on the Board of the American National Election Studies and the Board of the General Social Survey. Prior to Berkeley, Lee was Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard. Lee was born in South Korea, grew up in rural Malaysia, Manhattan, and suburban Detroit, and is a proud graduate of K-12 public schools, the University of Michigan (A.B.), Harvard University (M.P.P.), and the University of Chicago (Ph.D.).

More information can be found at: http://polisci.berkeley.edu/people/person/taeku-lee
Melissa Michelson

Melissa Michelson


Menlo College

Melissa R. Michelson is Professor of Political Science at Menlo College. She received her Ph.D. from Yale University. She is co-author of Mobilizing Inclusion: Redefining Citizenship through Get-Out-the-Vote Campaigns (Yale, 2012), which won the 2013 American Political Science Association's Ralph Bunche award and the 2013 best book award from the American Political Science Association's Race, Ethnicity and Politics section, and of Living the Dream: New Immigration Policies and the Lives of Undocumented Latino Youth (Paradigm, 2014). She has published dozens of articles in peer-reviewed academic journals, including recent pieces in Election Law Journal, International Migration Review, Polity, and Politics, Groups and Identities. Her current research projects explore voter registration and mobilization in minority communities and persuasive communication on contentious issues such as marriage equality.

More information can be found at:
http://www.menlo.edu/about/find-an-expert/melissa-michelson/
Diana Mutz

Diana Mutz


University of Pennsylvania

Diana C. Mutz is Samuel A. Stouffer Professor of Political Science and Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also directs the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics in the Annenberg Public Policy Center. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Mutz is a two-time winner of the APSA's Robert Lane Prize for the best book in the field of political psychology, once for Impersonal Influence: How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes (Cambridge, 1998) and again for Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative Versus Participatory Democracy (Cambridge, 2006). She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a former fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the Center for the Study of Citizens and Politics at Princeton University. In 2011, Mutz received the Distinguished Career Award for lifetime contributions to the study of political communication from the American Political Science Association. She has published articles in a variety of academic journals including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Politics and Journal of Communication. She served as Director of Innovation for the National Annenberg Election Study as well as founding co-PI of Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences. Her research focuses on mass media and public opinion.

More information can be found at:
https://www.sas.upenn.edu/polisci/people/standing-faculty/diana-mutz
Stephen P. Nicholson

Stephen P. Nicholson


University of California, Merced

Stephen P. Nicholson is Professor (and a founding faculty member) of Political Science at the University of California, Merced. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis, in 1998. He studies American politics, focusing on voting and elections, public opinion, political psychology, and direct democracy. Nicholson is the recipient of the 2006 Emerging Scholar Award given by the American Political Science Association's organized section on Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior and his articles have appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Cognitive Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Behavior, Political Research Quarterly, and PS: Political Science and Politics. Nicholson is also the author of Voting the Agenda: Candidates, Elections, and Ballot Propositions (Princeton University Press, 2005). His current research projects focus on the role of cues in public opinion formation, the psychology of political categories, partisan motivated reasoning, and direct democracy.

More information can be found at:
http://polisci.campuscms.ucmerced.edu/content/stephen-p-nicholson
Tasha Philpot

Tasha Philpot


University of Texas at Austin

Tasha Philpot is Associate Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her PhD. from the University of Michigan. She specializes in American Politics. Her particular interests are in African-American politics, public opinion and political behavior, political communication, and political parties. Her work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Black Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Political Behavior, Public Opinion Quarterly, National Political Science Review, and the Journal of Politics. In addition, she is the author of Race, Republicans, and the Return of the Party of Lincoln (University of Michigan Press, 2007), which examines the circumstances under which political parties can use racial symbols to reshape their images among the electorate and the co-editor of African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era (with Ismail K. White, Palgrave Macmillan Press, 2010).

More information can be found at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/government/faculty/tsp228
Douglas Rivers

Douglas Rivers


Stanford Univeristy

Douglas Rivers is Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University and taught previously at Harvard, Caltech, and UCLA. He is one of the world's leading experts on survey research. Rivers has founded two successful technology companies, Preview Systems and Knowledge Networks. Preview Systems pioneered the field of digital rights management, conducted a successful IPO in 1999, and was sold to Aladdin in 2001. Knowledge Networks introduced probability sampling to the Internet in 1998, and Rivers was CEO from 1998 to 2002; the company was acquired by GfK in 2011. He was named Executive of the Year in 2000 by Research Business Report and awarded the Innovator's Award by the American Association of Public Opinion Research in 2001 in recognition for his work at Knowledge Networks. He is currently the CEO of YouGov/Polimetrix. Rivers served as a consultant to CBS News and has published numerous academic papers in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Econometrics Journal, the Journal of Econometrics, and the American Economics Review.

More information can be found at: https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/people/douglas-rivers
Daron Shaw

Daron Shaw


The University of Texas at Austin

Professor Shaw received his B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from UCLA before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 1994. His most recent book is "Unconventional Wisdom" (Oxford University Press), which examines across time survey data to inform the popular conversation about voting and elections in the United States. In 2006, he published "The Race to 270" (University of Chicago Press) which analyzes the effects of TV advertising and candidate visits on the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections. In addition, Professor Shaw has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, The Journal of Politics, Political Communication, The British Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Behavior, Political Research Quarterly, Presidential Studies Quarterly, PS: Political Science, Party Politics, Electoral Studies, The Journal of Political Marketing, and American Politics Research.

Before accepting a position at Texas, Professor Shaw worked as a survey research analyst in several campaigns, including a stint as senior national data analyst for the 1992 Bush-Quayle campaign. In 1999-2000, he served as director of election studies for the Bush-Cheney campaign. In 2004, he served as a consultant for the Bush-Cheney campaign and the Republican National Committee. Professor Shaw is currently a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, a member of the board for the American National Election Study, a member of the Fox News Decision Team, co-director of the Fox News Poll, the PI for the UT Government Department/Texas Tribune survey, the director of the Texas Lyceum Poll, and a member of the advisory board for the Annette Strauss Institute. In 2013 he served as one of the lead academic advisors for the Presidential Commission on Election Administration. From 2003-2009 he served as a presidential appointee to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. He has also served as a consultant for the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute and the Texas Poll. Professor Shaw is the founder and director of Shaw & Company Research.


More information can be found at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/government/faculty/shawdr/
Randolph T. Stevenson

Randolph Stevenson


Rice University

Randy Stevenson is Professor of Political Science at Rice University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Rochester in 1996. His work concerns comparative legislative politics, comparative mass political behavior, and the intersection between these two realms. His recent book, The Economic Vote: How Political and Economic Institutions Condition Election Results (Cambridge University Press, 2008) won the Gregory M. Luebbert Award for the best book published in comparative politics during 2007-2008. His other work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, as well as other journals. He is currently an associate editor of the American Journal of Political Science. His current book project attempts to explain how differences in political context lead to differences in the extent and distribution of political knowledge in advanced democracies. As part of this project he is conducting a series of election surveys in European countries that probe how individuals understand complex coalitional politics.

More information can be found at: http://politicalscience.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=146
Joshua Tucker

Joshua Tucker


New York University

Joshua A. Tucker is Professor of Politics and (by courtesy) Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, a co-Director of the NYU Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) laboratory (smapp.nyu.edu), and a co-author of the award winning Monkey Cage blog at The Washington Post. He is also the co-editor of the Journal of Experimental Political Science, the Vice-President of the Midwest Political Science Association and a Member of the Executive Board of the Association for the Study of East European and Eurasian Societies. Professor Tucker specializes in mass political behavior in East-Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, including elections and voting, the development of partisan attachment, public opinion formation, mass protest, and social media. He is the author of Regional Economic Voting: Russia, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic, 1990-99 (Cambridge University Press, 2006). His work has appeared in numerous academic journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Electoral Studies, The Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, and the Annual Review of Political Science, and his opinions have been published in The New Republic, The Wall Street Journal, Al Jazeera English, Time, and the International Herald Tribune. In 2006, he was awarded the Emerging Scholar Award for the top scholar in the field of Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior within 10 years of the doctorate. In 2012 he was part of an interdisciplinary four-person team of NYU faculty to win one the National Science Foundation's inaugural $1 million INSPIRE-CREATIV grants.
Follow him on Twitter @j_a_tucker.

More information can be found at: https://files.nyu.edu/jat7/public/
Nicholas A. Valentino

Nicholas A. Valentino


University of Michigan

Nicholas Valentino is Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1998. His research focuses on political campaigns, racial attitudes, emotions, and social group cues in news and political advertising. His current work examines the intersection between racial attitudes and emotion in predicting political participation and vote choice, as well as the sources of public support and opposition to immigration in the U.S. and cross-nationally. His projects have been supported by multiple research grants from the National Science Foundation. In 2005, Valentino received the Erik Erikson Award from the International Society of Political Psychology in recognition of exceptional early career achievement in the field of political psychology. His research has appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Behavior, Annual Review of Political Science, Political Communication, Journal of Communication, Political Psychology, and many other scholarly journals..

More information can be found at: More information can be found at: http://www.isr.umich.edu/cps/people_faculty_nvalenti.htmlail
Lynn Vavreck

Lynn Vavreck


University of California Los Angeles

Lynn Vavreck is Professor of Political Science and Communication Studies at UCLA and director of the UCLA Center for the Study of Campaigns. She received a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Rochester. She was introduced to survey research by Warren Miller, for whom she worked as a research assistant at Arizona State University. Before her appointment at UCLA, Vavreck was an assistant professor at Dartmouth College (1998-2001) and was Executive Director of the Princeton University Campaign Reform Task Force (1997-1998). Outside of the academy, Vavreck is a contributing columnist to The New York Times. She also worked previously for the White House Advance Office and has consulted for Silicon Valley start-up companies interested in survey methodology and research. In 2006, Vavreck fielded the Cooperative Congressional Election Study (CCES), an online election survey of 30,000 people that was jointly funded by over 100 political scientists at more than 15 universities around the world. Building on that model, in 2008 she and Simon Jackman fielded the Cooperative Campaign Analysis Project (CCAP), which surveyed 20,000 impaneled respondents over 6 waves between 2007-2008. Vavreck has helped to field variants of CCAP in four other countries: the UK, Germany, Canada, and Australia. She has published four books including The Gamble (Princeton University Press, 2013), an award winning book on the 2012 election, and The Message Matters: The Economy and Presidential Campaigns (Princeton University Press, 2009). In addition to the ANES Board, she has served on the Board of Advisors for the British Election Study and on the advisory committee for the Public Policy Institute of California.

More information can be found at: http://www.polisci.ucla.edu/people/lynn-vavreck