CONTENTS OF THE CONTINUITY GUIDE


                                                                           
    page

                   
Introduction................................................ iii
Sampling information........................................ vii
NES samples, 1948-1993...................................... xiii
How to read a Continuity Guide entry........................ xxix
                                                                           
     



For contents of chapters I-V, see beginnings of chapters.*



     CHAPTERS:


I.   DEMOGRAPHICS, GROUPS, AND QUALITY OF LIFE/PERSONAL..........   1
II.  CANDIDATES, PARTIES, THERMOMETERS, PARTY ID................. 119
III. PUBLIC OPINION: ISSUES AND IDEOLOGY......................... 283
IV.  MASS SUPPORT OF THE POLITICAL SYSTEM........................ 515
V.   PARTICIPATION, INVOLVEMENT, MEDIA........................... 559






VI.     SURVEY ADMINISTRATION
Field............................................ 669
Interviewer Supplement........................... 682
Sampling......................................... 686

VII.     APPENDICES                                                    

A.  Contextual Data..................................... 691
B.  Pilot Studies....................................... 703
C.  Vote Validation..................................... 719
D.  Non-Response and Field Administration Files......... 721
E.  Table:  Years of Pooled Senate data vars............ 725
                                                                           
        

                                                                           
   





                                                                      
     * Please see p.xxix "HOW TO READ A CONTINUITY GUIDE ENTRY" before
     consulting individual entries




                                 INTRODUCTION




I.  Overview of National Election Studies Data Collections



     National election surveys have been conducted in 1948 and biennially
since 1952 by the Center for Political Studies (CPS) of the Institute for
Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan and by its
predecessor, the Political Behavior Program of the Survey Research Center. 
From 1978 on, the election studies have been carried out under long-term
grants from the National Science Foundation and, as such, are
collaborative ventures of:  1) the NES Board of Overseers; 2) resource
panelists serving on study planning committees; 3) a committee of
Congressional elections researchers; and 4) the NES/CPS staff. (NSF grants
are Nos. SOC77-08885, SES-8207580, and SES-8341310).

     In presidential election years, respondents are interviewed in the
two months before the general election and reinterviewed during the two
months after the election.  In nonpresidential election years, only
post-election interviews are conducted.  The pre- and post- election
surveys comprise the NES time series.  All time series surveys have been
administered using in-person interviewing, with two exceptions: (1) In
1984, half of the reinterviews were by telephone, (2) In 1992, 276 pre and
474 post interviews were con-  ducted over the phone (see the 1992
codebook).  

     American National Election Study data are in the public domain and
are processed and documented for use outside CPS.  Machine- readable fully
processed data and printed machine-readable documentation prepared by the
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
Archive are available for each study in the time series.  Since 1978,
Early Release, interim- processed data files with printed documentation
are also available.

     A Consortium codebook documents a single election survey and
includes, in addition to question text and codes, marginal distributions
for code values, a sample description, and all technical information
required to access the data in a variety of formats.  Most election study
codebooks contain a copy of the interview schedule.

     Member and nonmember inquiries about data and codebooks should be
addressed to:  
                    ICPSR Member Services
                    Institute for Social Research 
                    Box 1248
                    Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 USA 


or to the campus representative at Consortium member institutions.  Local
representatives maintain library copies of the printed codebooks and
either maintain or can acquire library copies of the data.

II.  NES Data Collections in the Continuity Guide





   The Continuity Guide describes the NES biennial time-series studies,
omitting only the first election survey in 1948 and a short survey in
1954. 

   Also included in the Guide are supplementary NES data collections
carried out 1980-1992:  (1) In 1980 a four-wave year-long major panel and
a two-wave minor panel;  (2) In 1982, a Method Comparison project carried
out using Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI);  (3) In 1984 a
year-long Continuous Monitoring Study employing telephone interviews;  (4)
In 1988 a 'Super-Tuesday' Study and a Senate Study (which was conducted in
cooperation with Market Opinion Research);  (5) In 1988-1990-1992 three
Senate studies with data combined in the Pooled Senate Study datafile; 
and  (6) In 1990-1991-1992 a 'Consequences of War' Panel.  [See "NES
Samples, 1948-1993" on p.xiii for fuller descriptions of these studies.] 
These supplementary studies are included in the main body of the Guide. 

   In addition, Appendices A-D provide brief descriptions of NES data
which are not part of the time series nor part of the major supplementary
data collections listed above.  Contextual data collections assembled in
the 1978 and 1980 studies, in the Pooled Senate File, and in the 1991
Pilot/Panel Study are documented in Appendix A.  Pilot studies undertaken
in 1979, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, and 1993 are outlined in Appendix
B.  An account of Vote Validation data of 1964, 1976 (panel), 1978, 1980,
1984, 1986, 1988 and 1990 appears in Appendix C.  In Appendix D is a
description of the 1986, 1988, 1990, and 1992 nonresponse datasets.

Appendix E provides a table of information about the 1988-1990-1992 Pooled
Senate datafile to help users determine which variables contain valid data
(or are INAP) for which years.


III. General Description of the Continuity Guide



   This is a directory of the American National Election Studies data
collections which emphasizes the similarity of items which have appeared
in the surveys.  

   The Guide is intended to assist users of election study data to
determine whether and when a topic has been addressed in the series. 
Every question in the NES surveys is referenced; however, variations
across time in question wording or in coding schemes are NOT described. 
For this reason, we issue the following warning:

               USERS ARE CAUTIONED THAT INCLUSION OF SEVERAL
          YEARS WITHIN A QUESTION-ENTRY SHOULD NOT BE 
          ASSUMED TO GUARANTEE EXACT COMPARABILITY OF THE 
          ITEMS FOR ALL RESEARCH PURPOSES.  THE COMPLETE 
          QUESTION TEXTS AND CODE DEFINITIONS CAN BE FOUND 
          IN THE CODEBOOKS.


Note, however, that if a survey question also appears in the NES 1952-1992
Cumulative File, a full description of changes over time is provided in
the Cumulative File codebook.




   Each Continuity Guide entry includes the following:


          1-   a short descriptor of question content
          2-   the NES study years in which the question appears
          3-   the final variable number(s) assigned to the question

See p.xxix for a sample entry described in detail.

     Items are listed by variable number reference using the FINAL version
of the publicly distributed codebooks and data files.  This Guide
complements but does not replace the full documentation of studies
provided in the studies' codebooks.   Codebooks are available from ICPSR.



IV. Relationship of Continuity Guide to NES Sourcebook

     Five analytic themes are represented in Guide Chapters I-V: 


          I    -  Demographics, Groups, and Quality of Life/ Personal

          II   -  Candidates, Parties, Thermometers and Party ID

          III  -  Public Opinion:  Issues and Ideology

          IV   -  Mass Support of the Political System

          V    -  Participation, Involvement, Media


     These analytic themes, which are further detailed in the Tables of
Contents of Chapters I-V, provide an outline of the Continuity Guide by
subject.  

     This thematic organization was originally designed to correspond to
the foci of chapters in NES's American National Election Studies Data
Sourcebook.  This publication, however, has been updated and expanded*.  

     Topical agreements between chapters of the 'new' Sourcebook and
chapters of the Guide have been maintained as much as possible.  Thematic
correspondence is present between Guide chapters I-V and Sourcebook
chapters 1-5 with two exceptions:  

     #1)  the concern of (new) chapter 6 of the Sourcebook [The Vote] is
          incorporated into the fifth chapter [V. Participation] of the
          Continuity Guide;  and 


     #2)  new content on the Congress which has since 1978 been absorbed
          into Chapter III [Partisanship/Candidates] of the Guide appears
          in the updated Sourcebook as (new) Chapter 7.

     More generally, the chief distinction in question coverage between
these two documents continues to reside in the exhaustiveness of the
Guide, compared to the selectivity of questions included in the Sourcebook
(or included in the Cumulative File).

*  [American National Election Studies Data Sourcebook, 1952-1986, by W.E.
Miller and Santa Traugott (Cambridge:  Harvard University Press, 1988)].




                             SAMPLING INFORMATION




I.  Overview of Sample Design


     Data for most American National Election Studies time series surveys
are obtained from in-person interviews with citizens of voting age1 living
in households2 within the coterminous United States exclusive of those on
military reservations3.  Election Study samples are multistage area
probability designs.  That is, in a series of hierarchical steps,
geographically defined sampling units of decreasing size are selected with
probability proportionate to their total occupied housing unit count.


II.  The Sample Frame


     The sample frame and design from 1952 through 1976, and in 1982, was
that employed by the Survey Research Center to select national probability
samples of households4.  It consisted of 74 sample points (66 before 1963)
located in 37 states and the District of Columbia.  In the multistage area
probability sampling, first-stage stratification of SMSAs and counties was
carried out independently within each of the four major Census-defined
geographic regions, each of which received representation in proportion to
population.  Over all regions, the SMSAs and counties were assigned to 74
relatively homogeneous groups or strata.  Twelve of these strata contained
only one primary area each; these were the 12 major metropolitan areas
which were included with certainty.  The remaining 62 strata contained
from two to 200 or more primary areas (SMSAs or county groups).  From each
stratum one primary area was selected with probability proportionate to
population.  This sampling process leads to approximately equal sample
sizes from the 62 sample areas.

     In 1978 and 1980, the sampling frame was redefined so that
congressional districts in the coterminous United States constituted the
sampling primary areas.  The universe of eligible congressional districts
(which excluded the District of Columbia geographic area) was divided into
strata (108), each containing congressional districts of roughly
comparable characteristics with regard to geographic region, state,
urbanization, and recent voting behavior.  From each of the strata, one
district was selected with probability in proportion to the actual or
estimated population.  This sample design yields a probability sample of
both United States citizens of voting age and congressional districts, but
does NOT permit estimates for each district's constituency.  Region, as
defined by the Census Bureau four-fold classification, is a valid level of
analysis.

   Beginning in 1984, the studies have used the 1980 sampling frame
designed, selected, and listed jointly by the National Opinion Research
Center and the Survey Research Center5.  Like the samples for earlier
studies, the 1980 NORC/SRC sample is a multistage area probability design. 
Primary areas consist of counties, SMSAs, independent cities and, in New
England, parts of counties.

   For this sample, primary areas were grouped prior to selection into 84
strata, formed by grouping metropolitan and non- metropolitan PAs within
each of the four Census regions.  Within each region additional variables
were used to define strata.  Of the 84 primary areas selected at the first
stage, 16 were self-representing.  From the remaining 68 strata one
primary area was selected with probability proportionate to population.

   In order to provide for flexibility in sample design and for efficiency
in staffing primary areas, the sample design allows for use of 1/2, 2/3,
5/6 or all of the non-self-representing primary areas.  

   The 1984, 1988, and 1990 samples used the 1/2 sample option with 11
self-representing and 34 non-self-representing primary areas.  The 1986
study used the 2/3 option with 16 self-representing and 45
non-self-representing primary areas.  In 1992, the 'Panel' portion of the
sample was selected from the original 1990 sample (from among those cases
which had been successfully interviewed); the so-called 'Cross-section'
component of 1992 (i.e., new cases) was a fresh selection from the 2/3
partition of the 1980 National Sample (including 16 self-representing PSUs
and 45 non-self-representing PSUs).  The new cases in 1992 were added to
supplement the Panel cases in such a way that when the 'Panel' and fresh
'Cross-section' selections are combined for analysis a representative
cross-section of the study population has been maintained.



III.  Selection of Sample Units


   Within each of the designated primary areas, the geographic area is
divided and subdivided through several stages into successively smaller
sampling units.  By definition and procedure, each household belongs
uniquely to one sampling unit at each stage.  The selection procedure
yields a sample of households representative of the nation and of the four
major regions.  The sample is one in which each individual member of the
population has a known probability of selection, as probability selection
is enforced at all stages of the sample selection.

   Respondents are selected from households by an objective procedure
which allows no substitutions.  Although households are sampled at a
constant rate, designated respondents have variable selection rates
according to the number of eligible persons within the households.  To be
precise, data for each respondent should be weighted by the number of
eligible persons within the household.  However, distributions run using a
weight to compensate for these slightly unequal selection probabilities
produce only negligible differences between the weighted and unweighted
frequencies.





IV.  Special Samples and Weights


   Weighting procedures and additional respondents were utilized to
provide representative cross-section samples in 1958-1960 and 1974-1976
when panel design over time-series studies was implemented, or when
supplemental respondents in some population subgroups (such as the black
supplements in 1964, 1968, and 1970) were interviewed.  In addition,
because of the combined nature of the 1992 sample from 1990/1991 'Panel'
cases and from fresh cross-section cases, a weight is also used with 1992
data.

   ICPSR codebooks describe the sample(s) for each election study and the
weights which are appropriate for use when analyzing the data.  Archived
datasets include weight and filter variables which facilitate use of the
complex variables.


V.  Samples in Non-Timeseries Studies


     The telephone survey design of the 1984 Continuous Monitoring study
utilized, with some modification, the two-stage random digit dialing (RDD)
method of Waksberg-Mitofsky.  Implementation of this design varied in that
NES spread the use of each primary stage sample over the 46 week course of
the study.  Clusters selected at the primary stage were individually used
on a rotational basis, and  each produced, at most, one telephone number
per week.  This procedure produced 46 independent, consecutive cross-
section samples selected during the 46 weeks.

     The 1988 Presidential Nomination Process ('Super Tuesday') Study was
based on a two-stage RDD sample of telephone households in 16 non-self-
representing states which held 'Super Tuesday' primaries.  The RDD
methodology was unique in that all primary and secondary screening of
telephone households took place prior to the start of the actual survey
field period, except for an additional sample of 248 numbers which were
drawn from the original 495 clusters late in the study period in order to
achieve the target total-sample size.

     For the 1988-1990-1992 Pooled Senate data, the 1988 study produced a
random sample stratified by state.  The target number of interviews (75)
for each state in 1988 was based on a two-stage household selection
algorithm.  At the first stage, blocks of working household telephone
numbers were sampled with probability proportional to size.  Each PSU was
a block of working numbers within one hundred range or 'hundred-number-
block' (HNB).  Within each HNB, telephone numbers were chosen by a
restricted simple random sampling procedure.  The 1990 component used a
dual-frame design telephone sample.  Approximately half of the 1990 sample
was randomly selected from a frame of listed numbers, and half was
generated according to an entirely new RDD design, which produced random
telephone numbers from the set of hundred-series in the list sample. 
Within each of the 50 states, an equal probability sample of random
numbers was generated.  The 1992 study used a "list assisted" or "listed
hundred series" RDD sample design that selects telephone numbers using the
GENESYS RDD sampling system.  This design uses a one-stage selection of
telephone numbers with no clustering; samples of RDD telephone numbers are
selected from a frame consisting of all the possible numbers that can be
generated from a hundred series (the first 8 digits of a phone number)
which have at least 2 listed household phone numbers.  

     Among the NES Pilot studies (which were conducted in 1979, 1983,
1985, 1987, 1989, 1991 and 1993): 

     The 1979 PILOT STUDY was administered in person to a small random sample
     of respondents in 30 primary sampling areas.  The target was 5
     interviews per primary area.  

     For the 1983 PILOT STUDY, a subsample of respondents from the 1982 post-
     election study were selected.  All respondents with telephones were
     initially stratified according to degree of interest in politics and
     then, within categories of political interest, by degree of urbanicity. 
     From the ordered list and sampling in a systematic manner, 20 replicates
     (minisamples) of 32 respondents each were drawn and alternately assigned
     to the two forms of the questionnaire.  

     In the 1985 NES PILOT STUDY, a subsample of respondents of the 1984 time
     series study who were administered the personal form of the post-
     election interview (and who had provided telephone numbers) were
     interviewed.  Respondents age 60 and over were oversampled, so that
     analysis of the data combining cross-section with the elderly oversample
     requires use of a weight (which is not necessary for the cross-section
     alone).  

     The 1987 PILOT STUDY was a reinterview of a probability sample of
     respondents with telephone numbers who were administered Form A of the
     1986 NES post-election interview. (See 1989 note)

     1989 PILOT STUDY respondents were a subsample of 1988 post-election
     respondents with telephone numbers.  In both the 1987 Pilot and the 1989
     Pilot study, the sample was allocated disproportionately across five
     strata of sample respondents, where the five strata were defined using
     1984 NES quintile ranges for a special voter knowledge-and-interest
     index.  Within each stratum the sample rate was set to the inverse
     probability of response.  Probability of response was defined as the
     actual response rate obtained by the 1985 Pilot in the five information
     categories. 

     The 1991 PILOT STUDY, because it comprised one wave of the 'Gulf War'
     Panel, was an attempt to reinterview all 2000 respondents from the 1990
     post-election study within the constraints of conducting telephone
     interviews.

     The 1993 PILOT STUDY was an attempt to reinterview those 1005
     respondents from the post-election wave of the 1992 PrePost who were
     'Cross-section' cases, i.e., who were new selections in 1992 (not
     interviewed in 1990/1991).


   ICPSR codebooks describe in fuller detail the sample(s) for each of
these supplementary studies and the weights, when needed, which are
appropriate for use when analyzing the data.  Archived datasets include
weight and filter variables which facilitate use of the complex variables.



 ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ 

     Footnotes

          1Politically ineligible persons were interviewed in 1970, when
          18-to-20-year-olds were interviewed, and in 1974, when 16- and
          17-year-olds were included.  The 1974 archived dataset excluded 
          data for the 16- and 17-year-olds.[con't]
          Minimum voting age in 1952 was 18 in Georgia and 21 in all other
          states; from 1956 through 1970, voting age was 18 in Georgia and
          Kentucky and 21 in all other states (Alaska with a voting age of
          19 and Hawaii with voting age of 20 were not included in the
          sample); since 1972, minimum voting age has been 18 in all
          states.

          2The sample unit was dwelling unit prior to the 1972 survey;
           housing unit 1972-1980.

          3Certain types of institutional and transient or seasonal
           facilities are also excluded from the sample universe. 
           Civilians residing on military bases were included in the 1984
           sample universe.

          4See Leslie Kish and Irene Hess, "The Survey Research Center's
           National Sample of Dwellings" (Ann Arbor:  Institute for Social
           Research, The University of Michigan, 1965.  ISR 2315).  See
           also Leslie Kish, Survey Sampling, New York:  John Wiley and
           Sons, 1964, and Irene Hess, Sampling for Social Research
           Surveys, 1947-1980 (Ann Arbor:  Institute for Social Research,
           The University of Michigan, 1985. ISR 4654).

          5See Steven G. Heeringa, Judith H. Connor, and Doris C. Darrah,
           1980 SRC National Sample:  Design and Development (Ann Arbor: 
           Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan,
           1986).

NES Samples, 1948-1993                         
..............................


TYPES AND SIZES OF NES SAMPLES AVAILABLE FOR ANALYSIS IN EACH SURVEY ARE
SUMMARIZED BELOW.  ICPSR STUDY NUMBERS ARE GIVEN IN PARENTHESES AFTER
TITLES.

    "V.#"  - refers to variable numbers in archived dataset;
    "*"    - means question(s) administered to subset of year's sample

                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
1948                                                        
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1948 (ICPSR 7218)

          662 TOTAL RESPONDENTS 

               - 577 pre-election interviews:                38-44
               - 662 post-election interviews:                1-37,
                                                             45-50

               - 577 respondents were interviewed in both 
                 pre- and post-election surveys.  (610 
                 pre interviews actually took place; 33 
                 pre-election respondents were not re- 
                 interviewed in the post-election survey
                 and were dropped from the released data).
                 85 post respondents had not been 
                 successfully interviewed in the pre- 
                 election survey.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
1952                                                        
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1952 (ICPSR 7213)

          1799 TOTAL RESPONDENTS   (185 pre-election only,
                                    100 post-election only)

               - 1799 pre-election interviews:               5-167
               - 1714 post-election (re)interviews:        168-207

               -  585 post-election respondents         
                  received an extended reinterview:        208-236*
                  (43 of these Rs have no pre data)       

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 



                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1956
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1956 (ICPSR 7214)

          1762 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 1762 pre-election interviews:       9-191,259-298
               - 1762 post-election reinterviews:          192-270
                     (Respondents interviewed only 
                      once are not included in the 
                      archived dataset.)

               - 579 post-election respondents 
                 received an extended reinterview:         271-294*

                    [N.B.: The post interview was 
                    conducted in conjunction with the
                    Economic Behavior Program's Fall 
                    1956 Omnibus Survey.  Respondents
                    who were asked the economic 
                    questions only are not included 
                    in the archived dataset.]  
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1958
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1958 (ICPSR 7215, Class II)

          1450 TOTAL RESPONDENTS, WEIGHTED TO 1822

               - 1450 post-election interviews:              1-269

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1960
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1960 (ICPSR 7216)

          1181 TOTAL RESPONDENTS,     (72 pre-election only,*
               WEIGHTED TO 1954        17 post-election only*)

               - 1164 pre-election interviews:              17-189
               - 1109 post-election (re)interviews:        190-272
          * unweighted

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1956,1958,1960
     AMERICAN PANEL STUDY:  1956, 1958, 1960 (ICPSR 7252, Class II)

          1514 TOTAL RESPONDENTS, WEIGHTED TO 1966

                    (NOTE: Respondents must have 1960 IW
                    plus 1956 or 1958 IW [or both].) 
      
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
1962
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1962 (ICPSR 7217)

          1297 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 1297 post-election interviews:               1-102

                    (NOTE: This study was a section of the
                    Fall 1962 Economic Behavior Program's
                    Fall Omnibus Survey. Respondents asked 
                    only the economic questions not included.) 

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1964
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1964 (ICPSR 7235)

          1834 TOTAL RESPONDENTS      ( 263 black supplement,
                                        1571 cross-section)

               - 1834 pre-election interviews:               14-272
               - 1684 post election reinterviews:           273-422
               - Vote Validation Study:                     423-458

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1966
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1966 (ICPSR 7259)

          1291 TOTAL RESPONDENTS                              

               - 1291 post-election interviews:              1-242

                    (NOTE: This study was conducted in
                    conjunction with the Economic Behavior
                    Program's Fall Omnibus Survey
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1968
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1968 (ICPSR 7281)

          1673 TOTAL RESPONDENTS       ( 116 black supplement,
                                         1557 cross-section)

               - 1673 pre-election interviews:              22-269
               - 1481 post-election reinterviews:          270-532
                                        (post incl. 36 respondents
                                        to mail questionnaires)
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 



                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1970
    AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1970 (ICPSR 7298)

          1694 TOTAL RESPONDENTS:  ( 114 black supplement,
                                    1580 cross-section*)

               - 1694 post-election interviews:              1-403

               Questions were      Type I questions:    v45-57,141-143,
               categorized within                       155-158,228
               3 types as follows:
                                   Type II questions:   v61-84

                                   Type 0 questions:    v1-44,58-60
                                                        85-140,144-154,
                                                        159-227, 229-403

                                 (NOTE:  All respondents were asked 
                                  type 0 questions.  All blacks were  
                                  asked Type I and Type II questions.
                                  Approximately half of the white      
                                  respondents were asked Type I questions
                                  and the other half were asked Type II
                                  questions.)

          *cross-section incl. 73 respondents
           ineligible voters

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 




                                                               V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1972
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1972 (ICPSR 7010)

          2705 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 2705 pre-election interviews:              20-437
               - 2285 post-election reinterviews:          438-1070


                          (NOTE: both pre and post interviews were     
                           divided into "FORM I" or "FORM II." 
                           Approximately half of the respondents were
                           administered the Form I interviews; the other
                           half were administered the Form II interviews.
                           94 respondents who refused post IWs were 
                           mailed and completed mail questionnaires, 
                           designated as "FORM III" or "FORM IV:"  of
                           these 94, respondents interviewed with Form I
                           in the pre were administered Form III of the
                           mail questionnaires; Form II respondents in  
                           the pre were interviewed with Form IV of the
                           mail questionnaires.)     

                             QUESTIONS APPEARING IN FORM I ONLY:   
                                30-49,51-53,107-108,164-168,
                                172-183,208-213,456-467,497-537,
                                593-605,865-931,941-967,980-981.

                             QUESTIONS APPEARING IN FORM II ONLY:          
                                                                          
                                54-102,184-195,214-219,444-455,
                                538-569,606-612,661-669,673-700,
                                768-809.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1974
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1974 (ICPSR 7355)

          1575 TOTAL RESPONDENTS, WEIGHTED TO 2523

               - 1575 post-election interviews:           2001-2564
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1976
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1976 (ICPSR 7381)

          2248 TOTAL RESPONDENTS, WEIGHTED TO 2868.5

               - 2248 pre-election interviews:            3022-3523
               - 1909 post-election reinterviews:         3524-3952
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 






                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1972,1974,1976 
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION SERIES:  1972,1974,1976
                                                 (ICPSR 7381)

     1320 PANEL RESPONDENTS FOR 1972-1974-1976
     1624 PANEL RESPONDENTS FOR 1972-1974
     1201 PANEL RESPONDENTS FOR 1974-1976 (WEIGHTED:1843)

     2705 CROSS-SECTION RESPONDENTS, 1972
     1575 CROSS-SECTION RESPONDENTS, 1974 (WEIGHTED:2523)
     2259 CROSS-SECTION RESPONDENTS, 1976 (WEIGHTED:5762)
                                        
                             . 1972 vars:                    1-1006
                             . 1972 recoded & summary:    1067-1112
                             . 1974 vars:                 2001-2564
                             . 1974 recoded & summary:    2565-2603
                             . 1976 vars:                 3001-3952
                             . 1976 recoded & summary:    3953-3969
                             . Master file vars:          4001-4011
                             . Vote validation data:      5001-5417

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1978
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1978 (ICPSR 7655)

          2304 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 2304 post-election interviews:

                             . Survey:                       1-648
                             . Contextual:                1001-1541
                             . Individual Voter Record:   1399-1411
                             . Election Administration:   1475-1485
                             . Derived:                   2001-2141

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1979
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION PILOT STUDY, SPRING 1979
                                              (ICPSR 7709, Class IV)

          Personal interviews taken using a small
          random sample in 30 primary sampling areas.

               - 280 interviews in March 1979; 
               - 246 reinterviews in April. 

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 


                                                               V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
1980 [3 components]
         AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1980  (ICPSR 7763, 5 vol.)

     1614 TOTAL RESPONDENTS IN PRE-POST (VOLUME I)

              - 1614 pre-election interviews [C3]:           53-737
              - 1408 post-election reinterviews [C3po]:     738-1196
              - Vote Validation:                           1197-1208
              - Contextual:                                5001-5225
                                      (NOTE: contextual data
                                 are in Appendix A)
                        
                    ******************************************************
                    *****

     1008 TOTAL RESPONDENTS IN 4-WAVE MAJOR PANEL 
                                            Jan./June  (VOLUME II)
                                            Sept./Nov. (VOLUME III)

              - 1008 Jan.-Feb. interviews [P1]:               5-612
              - 843 June reinterviews [P2]:                2001-2440
              - 769 September reinterviews [P3]:           3001-3587
              - 764 Nov. reinterviews (phone) [P4]:        4001-4114
              - Vote validation:                           4115-4126
              - Contextual:                                5001-5225
                                     (NOTE: contextual data
                                are in Appendix A)
                        
                    ******************************************************
                    *****
          
     3929 TOTAL RESPONDENTS IN INTEGRATED FILE
                              (Minor Panel Class II Data; INTEGRATED
     VOLUMES I,II)

              - Combined data from 8 data collections: 

                        pre-post survey (see above):   C3       
                                                       C3po
                           major panel (see above):    P1
                                                       P2
                                                       P3
                                                       P4
                           minor panel:                C1 April 
                                                       C4 Nov.
                       [The integrated file contains all questions in the
                        prepost (C3, C3po) and in the major panel (P1-P4)
                        including vote validation but excluding contextual
                        data and pre-post questions H5-H24, L4-L9.  Minor
                        panel data (C1, C4) do not exist independently
                        elsewhere.  The minor panel consists of 1307 April
                        IWs and 965 November (phone) reinterviews.]       
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1982
         AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1982 (ICPSR 9042)

     1418 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

              - 1418 post-election interviews:                1-779
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

                                                               V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 
1982
     METHOD COMPARISON PROJECT, 1982 (ICPSR 8233, Class IV)

          2416 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               998 CATI interviews; 
               1418 personal interviews.
               Respondents from the 1982 post-election         
               interviewed to compare telephone with
               personal interview methods.                    1-95 
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1983
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1983 PILOT STUDY
                                             (ICPSR 8178, Class IV)

               A sample of 314 respondents from the
               1982 ANES.  Telephone interviews in July;
               274 telephone reinterviews in August.  
               There are 404 Pilot vars; the dataset also
               includes the 1982 post-election variables.
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1984 [3 components]
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1984 (ICPSR 8298, 3 vol.)

          2257 TOTAL PRE-POST RESPONDENTS

               - 2257 Pre-election interviews:               75-721
               - 1989 post-election reinterviews:           722-1118
                          (NOTE: 978 reinterviews were
                          in-person and 1011 were by
                          telephone; 45 of the telephone
                          IWs were abbreviated.)

                     Vote Validation data:                 1119-1135
                     Socio-economic index scores,
                     occupation:                           1136-1141
               ***********************************************************
               *******

          3496 TOTAL CONTINUOUS MONITORING RESPONDENTS
                                                      (Class IV)

               3496 telephone interviews January-December
               with 46 independent, consecutive samples       1-1134
               ***********************************************************
               ******

         FIELD ADMINISTRATION, CONTINUOUS MONITORING
                                                        (Class IV)

               10,464 telephone number records.               1-45
               (Cannot be merged with CM File.)
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

                                                               V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1985
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1985 PILOT STUDY
                                         (ICPSR 8476, Class IV)

          429 TOTAL RESPONDENTS FROM 1984 ANES
               (cross-section plus oversample of the elderly).

               Telephone interviews in November-December, 
               1985; 345 telephone reinterviews December 
               1985-January 1986.  The dataset includes
               1984 Pre-Post variables; 511 Pilot Study vars.
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1986
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1986  (ICPSR 8678)

          2176 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 2176 Post-election interviews:               1-769
               - Vote validation:                           770-802
               - Election Administration                   2501-2620

                    (NOTE:  Two forms were administered 
                    in one instrument.  About 3/4 of the 
                    questionnaire is common material.)

                              Form A only:   V72-95, 358-363, 
                                             377-380, 469-474,
                                             510, 534-557.
                              Form B only:   V426-427, 475-480, 
                                             484-486, 505-506,
                                             508-509, 511-519,
                                             559-592.
               
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1987
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1987 PILOT STUDY
                                                    (ICPSR 8713, Class IV)

               457 respondents from 1986 ANES, Form A,
               disproportionately sampled from strata
               defined by voter knowledge index.
               Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviews in
               May; 360 reinterviews June 2-July 2.
               The dataset includes 1986 Post variables;
               1345 Pilot Study vars.
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1988
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1988 (ICPSR 9196)

          2040 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 2040 pre-election interviews:               1-563
               - 1775 post-election reinterviews:          564-1116
               - Vote validation:                         1117-1148
               - Election Administration:                 1149-1301

                    (NOTE:  All questions appeared
                    in both Form A and Form B, but some
                    questions were administered
                    differently according to Form.
                    Question order and question
                    wording experiments are described
                    in the codebook.)

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ

1988
   AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY 1988: THE PRESIDENTIAL
     NOMINATION PROCESS [SUPER-TUESDAY]       (ICPSR 9093, Class IV)

          2117 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

             620 variables.  Telephone interviews 
             before and after Super Tuesday; 1688
             respondents participated in the
             reinterview following Super Tuesday.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ
1989
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1989 PILOT STUDY
                                                        (ICPSR 9295, Class
                                   IV)

            614 respondents from 1988 ANES,
            disproportionately sampled from strata
            defined by voter knowledge index.
            Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviews
            (forms A,B,C,D) July 6 - August 1, 1989;
            reinterviews with 494 respondents
            September 6 - October 6.
            The dataset includes 1988 Pre-Post
            variables; 633 Pilot Study vars.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ






                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1990
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1990  (ICPSR 9548)

          1980 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 1980 Post-election interviews:               1-711
               - Vote validation:                          2003-2047
               - Election Administration                   2103-2149

                    (NOTE:  Two forms were administered 
                    in one instrument.  About 3/4 of the 
                    questionnaire is common material.)

                              Form A only:   V328-335, 426-433,
                                              463-470, 500-503, 
                                              517-523.
                              Form B only:   V74-97, 336-354,   
                                              434-438, 496-499,
                                              516.
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1991
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1991 PILOT STUDY/
     1991 PANEL WAVE ("POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF WAR")  
                                                                (ICPSR
                                   9673, Class IV)

            Comprises the 1991 Pilot Study and the
            second wave of a 1990-1991-1992 Gulf War
            panel study. (Wave I was the 1990 NES post).
            1385 respondents from 1990 ANES were inter-
            viewed:  an attempt was made to interview 
            every 1990 NES respondent.  Computer-Assisted
            Telephone Interviews (Forms I,II,III) 
            conducted June 4 - July 31, 1991.
            The dataset includes 1990 Post
            variables.  414 Pilot/Panel variables,
            including derived vars and county-level
            Census data contextual variables on race.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ


                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 

1992
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1992 (ICPSR 6067)

          2485 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               - 2485 pre-election interviews:                       3001-4237
               - 2255 post-election reinterviews:                    5001-6315

     1126 of pre-election respondents were 'new' cross-section,
     having no prior interview.  1359 pre-election respondents
     had been interviewed in 1990 [1060 of these were also inter- 
     viewed in the 1991 Panel/Pilot Study as part of the 1990- 
     91-92 Panel].

     1005 post-election respondents were part of the 'new'
     cross-section.  1250 post-election respondents were members
     of the 1990-91-92 Panel.

     The dataset includes variables from the 1990 and 1991 studies
     for the panel respondents

     (NOTE:  1992 Variable numbering has numerous gaps.)

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ

1988,1990,1992
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1988-1990-1992 
     SENATE STUDIES:  POOLED DATA                (ICPSR 9580, Class IV)

          9253 TOTAL RESPONDENTS

               Combined data from the 1988, 1990, and
               1992 NES Senate Studies (1899 variables,
               including survey, derived and contextual
               variables).  Due to redistricting since
               1990, the survey instrument was somewhat
               redesigned for 1992.
                                     
              (NOTE:  This is the only dataset in which 
                      the 1992 Senate Study data appear.  In 
                      1992 there were 2759 respondents.

                      Telephone interviews were conducted
                      by Market Strategies, Inc. (MSI) using 9
                      versions of questionnaire.  These
                      versions were classified by type of
                      House and Senate race in Respondent's 
                      congressional district.)

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 


                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ

1990,1991,1992
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1990-1991-1992 FULL PANEL STUDY
     (Consequences of War)                      (ICPSR 6230, Class IV)

          1980 TOTAL RESPONDENTS  

            298 interviewed only in 1990
            323 interviewed in 1990 and in 1991
             34 interviewed in 1990 and in 1992 pre
            265 interviewed in 1990 and in 1992 pre
                  and post
             75 interviewed in 1990, 1991 and 1992 pre
            985 interviewed in 1990, 1991, and 1992
                  pre and post

                             . 1990 post vars:               1-0711
                             . 1991 pilot/panel vars:     2002-2926
                             . 1992 pre vars:             3001-4237
                             . 1992 post vars:            5001-7002
                             . Vote validation data:      0712-0803
                                 (1990)

               (NOTE:  1991 and 1992 Variable numbering has numerous
               gaps.)

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ 


                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ

1952-1992
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDIES CUMULATIVE FILE
                                                 (ICPSR 8475, Class IV)
          37,456 TOTAL RESPONDENTS*

               723 variables selected from 21 NES pre/post
                  files, 1952-1992:

               . Processing:                               1-6,9-17
               . Personal Data:                            101-152
               . Group Thermometers:                       201-254
               . Partisanship:                             301-324 
               . Traits and Affects:                       326-397
               . Presidential & V.P. Likes/Dislikes:       401-411
               . Presidential/V.P. Cand. Thermometers:     424-446
               . Rating of Presidential Performance:       450-451
               . Major Parties and Issues:                 501-574
               . Mass Support of the Political System:     601-647,
                                                           650-655
               . Participation, Campaigns, the Media:      701-741
               . R's Positions on Issues:                  800-849,
                                                           870-872,
                                                           875,
                                                           880-881
               . Congressional Elections:                  900-978,
                                                           980-1016
               . New Variables:                           9001-9042,
                                                          9044-9067,
                                                          9069-9125,
               . Vote Validation (New):                   9149-9155 
     * unweighted


 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ




                                                                V. #
 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ
1993
     AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY:  1993 PILOT STUDY /
     1993 PANEL WAVE ("SECURING ELECTORAL SUCCESS")
                                                                           
  (ICPSR 6264, Class IV)

          1005 TOTAL CASES

               Comprises the 1993 Pilot Study and the
               third wave of the 1992-1993-1994 Panel Study
               on Securing Electoral Success.  Waves 1 and 2
               are the 1992 NES Pre- and Post-Election
               Study.  An attempt was made to interview
               each of 1005 cross-section respondents 
               to the 1992 post-election study.  There 
               were 750 respondents in the 1993 Panel/
               Pilot wave.  The dataset includes the
               1992 Election Study variables for all 
               1005 post cross-section respondents
               from that year.

 ΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝΝ








                    HOW TO READ A CONTINUITY GUIDE ENTRY:            (Sample):


                                                             
     ΪΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΏ                   ΪΔΔΔΔΔΔΏ  
  ΪΔ>³ R'S INTEREST IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS ³                   ³II.A.1³<ΔΏ
  ³  ΐΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΩ                   ΐΔΔΔΔΔΔΩ  ³
  ³                                                                 ³
  ³ ΪΔΔ>  - ## Extent R follows government and public affairs       ³
  ³ ³                                                               ³
  ³ ³          68: V430         72: V476*         74: V2027         ³
  ³ ³          76: V3599        78: RV10          80: V974;I654     ³
  ³ ³          82: V294[C]      84: V988;CM146    86: V301(A)       ³
  ³ ³          88: V812[&840];  90: V414          CWP:V2147         ³
  ³ ³              ST22         PS: V509          CF: V313          ³
  ΐΔΕΔmain topic                                                    ³
    ³                                                               ³
    ΐΔdescriptor which gives question substance.                      ³
                                                                    
      entry number of main topic in Table of Contents (Chap II, item A1).
 




                Note the Following Examples of Abbreviations:

     72: V476*       ΝΝΝ  *  -'*' indicates a question administered to
                                   only a subset of that year's sample.

     78: RV10        ΝΝΝ  RV - Var 10 is recoded from other vars.
 
     80: V974;I654   ΝΝΝ  I  - 1980 Integrated Data file var number.

     82: V294[C]     ΝΝΝ  [C]- 1982 var is also in 1982 Methods
                                        Comparison Project

     84: V988;CM146  ΝΝΝ  CM - 1984 Continuous Monitoring var number.

     86: V301(A)     ΝΝΝ  (A)- Form A only; (B) indicates Form B only.

     88: ST22        ΝΝΝ  ST - 1988 NES Super-Tuesday Study var number.

     88: V812[&840]  ΝΝΝ  &  - '&' numbers (only in years 1986ff) refer
                                   to associated probe var.

     CWP:V2147       ΝΝΝ CWP:- 1990-1991-1992 'Consequences of War' Panel
                                          File var. 

     PS: V509        ΝΝΝ PS: - 1988-1990-1992 Pooled Senate data var.
                               * indicates data not present all 3 years
                                   (see Appendix E).

     CF: V313        ΝΝΝ CF: - var in NES Cumulative File, 1952-1990.

     ##              ΝΝΝ     - indicates question also appears in
                               another entry (of same chapter-
                               subdivision) for additional years
                               because sequence of question flow
                               varies in other years.


                   USERS:   PLEASE READ "WARNING" ON Pg. iv